Thursday, November 1, 2018

Reading Assignment Blogpost - Chapter 6 Moments in History (due 11/8)


In the comment section below write a 150 word minimum response to Chapter 6 "Moments in History" Suggested topics include, but are not limited to:

Which essay from the assigned chapter spoke to your own experience the most?  Summarize the main points of the essay and give a personal anecdote that elaborates on why this article spoke to you. Which essay made you think about photography in a new way, or spoke to experiences you may not have been as familiar with?  Did any of the work completely confuse you?  Which photographer(s) highlighted are you the most interested in?  Again, summarize the article and explain why this essay has reshaped your ideas about photography.

Julie and Kaden will be leading the classroom discussion on Thursday 11/8

15 comments:

  1. Chapter 6: Moments in history was about how photography can capture life and events of the world. I really liked Sophie Ristelhueber photographs from that kind of showed the aftermath of war in the land. Martin Parr’s Common sense confuses me, I don’t really understand it or what the point of it was. The way he photographed everything the same way, with closely cropped, with flash, and with heightened color, is interesting. I also like Ziyah Gafic’s photograph Quest for ID, I think it’s really beautiful having the skeletons displayed on white bags with a beautiful landscape behind them. With the rugs hanging behind the skeletons to dry, is really cool since it makes the whole situation with the skeletons seem normal. Dinu Li’s photographs of documenting illegal immigrant’s belongings really shows the values, practicalities, and memories that are them. I really like that since the illegal immigrants couldn’t be captured in photographs, to show who they are their belongings were captured instead, I really like this idea.

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  2. This chapter shows how contemporary art in photography takes on the subject of the documentary photograph. Photographers in this chapter photography what is left behind in the after a tragedy, also known as ‘aftermath photography’. I found Luc Delahaye’s Kabul Road, 2001, interesting, because Delahaye’s photograph looks like it could be in a documentary film and makes them look like art. In Delahaye’s photograph Kabul Road, the subject looks like it could be haunted, because of the color of the sky, but also the color of the sky itself is somewhat beautiful. Another photograph that reminded me of Delahaye’s work was Simon Norfolk’s Destroyed Radio Installations, Kabul, 2001 (2001). I like how it was taken from a high perspective and it looks across a deserted desert landscape and, in the distance, it looks like there are mountains. Despite all of the rubble in the photo, I believe this is a very good image and the smoke, somewhat softness the image and gives it a sense of stillness.

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  3. Chapter 6 covers how to keep the social relevance of a photo while the world around us are continuously changing. I love the theme behind this chapter very much, I have always considered my style modern with a mix of nostalgia. So, I really enjoyed critiquing this chapter. A lot of these type of photos that are included within this chapter are very much so here to prove a point to others who are not living in the certain circumstances that are shown within the photograph. These photos can help aid those who are ignorant or who cannot think outside of THEIR normalcy. Which is one of my biggest pet peeves, be AWARE. Anyways, two artists that really stuck out to me were: Ziyah Gafic and Paul Graham.
    Ziyah Gafic's piece, #179 is a very bold photo. It is not really the type of photo you could show to a middle school history class and not expect an angry parent to call and complain about. It is no that I necessarily LIKE the subject matter of the photo, but I respect the raw truth that the skeleton's portray with the beautiful view in the background.
    On the complete opposite side of the spectrum, Paul Graham releases a very plain total suburbia photo that I can very heavily relate to. The photo was taken in California and is very accurate in the lighting, cars parked in front, and size of the home. As I mentioned previously inn my post, this is a perfect example of how some people may have a very skewed view of "normal". Graham's photo portrays how suburbia life is simple, clean-cut and beautiful...FROM THE OUTSIDE. But, one cannot be naive to the fact that there may be hidden skeletons in the backyard of photo #173.

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  4. Chapter 6 moments in history gave me a more emotional reaction than the previous chapters. With a husband who went off to war they were very real to me. One of my favorite photographers from this chapter was Fazal Sheikh. I love the black and white portraits of refugees and that he shows them so beautifully. They are in a horrible situation but, yet we see the beauty in their expressions and in the photography itself. Another one of my likes from this chapter is Martin Parr. These photos seem to be of nothing in particular but the colors and composition were very appealing to me. The photo by Andrea Robbins and Max Becher was odd for me. I can kind of see what they were trying to capture but it would have been more authentic to me if they would have had real native Americans not Germans in the attire.

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  5. I enjoyed chapter 6 because it showed more documented photography and showed different sides of history which tends to be dealing with war. Ziyah Gafic's photos are taken more during the aftermath of the civil war in Bosnia. He has taken photos of the remains found after the war. In one of his photos, laid out on tarps there was two skeletons that appeared to be burnt from the war. While in the background was the beautiful landscape of Bosnia behind a local mosque. Sophie Ristelhueber photographs the scenes of conflicts as well. She looks into the fragile borders of Uzbekistan,Tajikistan, Azerbaijan in some of her images. She also depicts a scene of abandoned clothes and spent explosive shells, showing the consequences of war. Many of these images are scenes of hardships in countries around the world that encapsulates the history of the place as the chapter title suggests. I enjoyed this chapter as it showed different sides of history which can be negative but even afterwards there's hope in some of these images.

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  7. Leticia Hernandez.
    This chapter was very eye opening. It exposed me to events that have happened in different parts of the world. In the American school system we are, for the most part, exclusively taught about American history, but are not taught about events that happen in other parts of the world that effects the U.S. Some of the photos are gruesome but show a harsh truth. Other photos are subtle and show how places look years after the smoke has settled. The photos that appeal to me the most are Fazal Sheikh's "Halima Abdullai" and Chan Chao's "Young Buddhist Monk" because I love seeing cultures I am not too familiar with captured in such a beautiful way. These photos inspired me because this is what i am trying to do with my own artwork.

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  8. Ziyah Gafic's image of the skeletons on the white bags interests me in this chapter since the skeleton on the right almost looks positioned with its arms behind its head in a "chillin" position. I am not completely sure how this caught my attention but it did. Upon reading about the image I found out why the skeletons were there and had to agree with the author about the carpets being hung to dry as shocking. This makes me thing that this must just be a normal thing that people must not be bothered by too much. Another artist Sophie Ristelueber, I liked her work with showing the aftermath of wars. I found this interesting because of all the trees on the ground. For it being such a simple picture I felt satisfied by it. Sometimes less is more I guess.

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  9. Ziyah Gafic's image of the skeletons on the white bags interests me in this chapter since the skeleton on the right almost looks positioned with its arms behind its head in a "chillin" position. I am not completely sure how this caught my attention but it did. Upon reading about the image I found out why the skeletons were there and had to agree with the author about the carpets being hung to dry as shocking. This makes me thing that this must just be a normal thing that people must not be bothered by too much. Another artist Sophie Ristelueber, I liked her work with showing the aftermath of wars. I found this interesting because of all the trees on the ground. For it being such a simple picture I felt satisfied by it. Sometimes less is more I guess.

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  10. The photographers and the images presented in Chapter 6, is documentary photos that focuses on sites of wars and the losses of them, presenting social events such as showing images the effects of afterwards, and deadpan style of people. Landscape photos typically were shown from a wide perspective rather than close up images. Captions of factual information accompanying the images, narrating what the image can’t tell by itself; therefore, it is an important aspect of documentary photography.
    An artist work I enjoyed from this chapter is, Ziyah Gafic. In his image, Quest for ID, depicts a gorgeous landscape in the background with a striking contrast of skeletons laid out on white bags that’s on the higher ground looking over the scenery. What is being documented is the return to normal life after war, with the outcomes of the conflict being presented. Specifically, in this image with the skeletons, Gafic is showing the missing people from Bosnia – Herzegovina after a civil war in 1992. The drastic colors in the foreground with all the white yet the dark contrasting of the skeletons, and the background scenery is peaceful and seems otherwise to be a regular day with good weather. I found that the picture portrays a strong message on its own, even without text providing information on what it’s about and that he captured the effects in the picture.

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  11. Chapter 6 was a very exciting chapter with many fantastic photos. I really enjoyed just about every picture in this chapter. But a couple really stood out to me. One of my favorites would be Simon Norfolks picture on page 171. I did a little researching on Simon's photography background and found some very interesting pictures. He shoots many of his photos in abandoned warzone areas around the world. He does a great job editing his photos as well, he puts a very suspensfull mood and tone in his pictures. It makes you wonder what happend in these abandoned war zones. Personally, I feel like im in the picture. Another talented photographer that caught my attention was Roger Ballen, his photo on page 188 was really interesting. I went into research on Roger as well and found a diffferent tecnique that was used on his photos. He doodled on paper and put these doodles around his pictures. It really gives a creepy vibe but also I feel so curious on why he drew these doodles. Its crazy how good they look in his photos and I feel like without them his photos would be quite dull.

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  13. In chapter 6, I like the works by Paul Graham. He photographs contemporary American society while also exploring issues related to social and economic racial divides. In his work Untitled 2001 on page 182 he photographs a nice Californian home with a view. It has two luxury vehicles parked outside in the driveway. Another image is a hazy image with a person walking. He uses this contrast to show the difference between how people live. This teaches me something new about photography because he uses contrasting images in a single series to make a point about life.
    I also really like the work by Willie Doherty on page 168. This photographer uses a photojournalism documentary approach to show a political situation in Northern Ireland. The photograph is very dark, perhaps under-exposed, but it works in this situation because there is a sense of carelessness associated with the trash left in the alley.

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